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Lutherkirche Bad Kösen

© Copyright by Brett Sayles

Description:

The protestant church in Bad Kösen.

Until 1860, the village of Kösen was administratively and ecclesiastically subordinated to the parish of Pforta, so it had neither a church nor its own pastor. Only twice a year, an open-air service was held in Kösen in the "Buchenhalle" in the woods, approximately above today's tennis court (painted by the painter Adolph Menzel in 1868 in his famous painting "Missionsgottesdienst in der Buchenhalle bei Kösen
The protestant church in Bad Kösen.

Until 1860, the village of Kösen was administratively and ecclesiastically subordinated to the parish of Pforta, so it had neither a church nor its own pastor. Only twice a year, an open-air service was held in Kösen in the "Buchenhalle" in the woods approximately above today's tennis court (captured by the painter Adolph Menzel in 1868 in his famous painting "Mission service in the Buchenhalle near Kösen").
Otherwise, the inhabitants of Kösen and increasingly also spa and bathing guests had to make the long way to the monastery church in Pforta every Sunday in order to be able to attend the service. This was often too difficult, especially for the latter. They founded a church building fund and collected donations for their own church.

On 5 May 1860, the separation of the community of Kösen with Fränkenau, Kukulau and the Saalhäuser from the mother community of Pforta was approved and the room shed of the former saltworks served from then on as a "prayer room". From Pforta it received a small bell, the former school bell "Hosianna", which called the faithful to church service until 1873, and as a parsonage the house of the former salt works accountant was left to the parish. The first parish priest was the former assistant parson Wilhelm Barthold, whose most important concern, apart from the parish work, was the construction of his own church.

As early as 1855 there were concrete plans for a church on the site of today's mining school. However, they were rejected because of the poor location. It was not until 19 September 1892 that the first sod was turned for the neo-Gothic church. Two years later, at the harvest festival on 30 September 1894, the church was then consecrated and was given the name of the reformer Martin Luther.

In the years 1951/52 the interior of the Lutherkirche was modernised and redesigned and the old wall paintings were whitewashed. In 1959, the three bronze bells with the tones "G sharp", "H" and "C sharp" were raised, which still call us to the service every Sunday. (Their changing predecessors had been melted down for the two world wars - a fate that many church bells had to share with them at that time).

But as far as the building substance of the Lutherkirche was concerned, there were some things in a bad way. Tiles fell down, the roof became leaky and rainwater could penetrate. The decay of the church continued to progress. In the 1970s, the roof could be covered, but no scaffolding was available for the 55-meter-high tower. Only when the tower threatened to collapse in the mid-1980s and the Bochum partner parish donated a steel tube scaffold was it possible to re-roof the steeple of the Luther Church.

After the political upheaval at the end of the 1980s and during the 1990s, the urgently needed construction work within the church could finally be tackled.
The interior of the church was renovated, among other things the saying above the altar arch was changed,
the lead-glass painted windows (PDF) with persons and representations from the New Testament were restored, and thanks to the generous support of the partner parish, a winter church with underfloor heating could be installed under the organ gallery.
Between 1996 and 1997, the long-awaited restoration of the romantic Rühlmann organ from 1894, which is still in its original state, finally took place, so that today it shines again in almost new splendour and impresses the listeners with its sound.

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Free visit possible

Where:

Address:

Evangelical rectory Bad Kösen

Käthe-Kruse-Strasse 1
06628 Bad Kösen
Phone: +49 34463 / 60271
E-mail: pfarramt-badkoesen@online.de
website: http://www.pfarrbereich-badkoesen.de/

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