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Deep cellar Merseburg

© Copyright by Sascha Rosick

Description:

A fantastic world under the city of Merseburg.

Vaults over 700 years old! An almost forgotten world!
The origin of this underground vault system dates back to the 13th century. The vaulted cellars in the Tiefer Keller quarter have survived fires, the economic and cultural rise and fall of the city and even the demolition of the old town during the socialist era. This makes them one of the oldest buildings in the
A fantastic world under the city of Merseburg.

Vaults over 700 years old! An almost forgotten world!

The origin of this underground vault system dates back to the 13th century. The vaulted cellars in the Tiefer Keller quarter have survived fires, the economic and cultural rise and fall of the city and even the demolition of the old town during the socialist era. They are thus among the oldest buildings in the city.

The cellars bear witness to the rich trading town of Merseburg from the Romanesque to the late Baroque period. They tell us about a warehouse management which had to keep large quantities of different goods cool. The owners of the wine and beer cellars had the wine cellars decorated with elaborate initials, which were chiselled into the sandstone doorways and some of which are still preserved today. Flat stairs facilitated the transport of loads. Four different altitudes ensured different temperatures and degrees of humidity.

The extensive vaulted cellars were built as a store for natural produce. The ice of the Saale was beaten in winter and brought to the cellars, where it provided ideal storage temperatures all year round. In addition to local goods such as fish, meat and beer, supra-regional goods such as oil could also be stored here. In the course of time, the facilities were continuously expanded and dug deeper into the ground. Interestingly enough, the youngest cellars are located at the bottom, the oldest at the top.

For the transport of goods over long distances, cooling storage facilities were also the basis for constant economic relations in medieval times. Spoiled goods would have interrupted, if not even ended, this. Situated on the Via Regia, the prosperous city of Merseburg was an important trading centre just outside the gates of Leipzig for many centuries. You can feel this significance every step you take through these once luxurious cold storage chambers in the labyrinth beneath the city.

For years, the Merseburger Kunstverein has been committed to the preservation, expansion and development of the extensive area. At present, it is therefore possible to visit the cellars with widths of between 2 and 6 metres as part of a guided tour over a total length of over 300 metres. The highest vaults are up to 2.70 metres high. When the vaults were uncovered, another special feature came to light - a fountain in the middle of the cellar.

In the future, art exhibitions will fill the deep cellars with new life. A skilfully spanned arc between history and modernity, which will make your visit an unforgettable experience.


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Public cellar tours:
every first Saturday of the month at 14:30

Meeting place: Deep cellar 3 (cathedral gallery)

Group tours are possible at any time by arrangement.
  • Bad weather offer
  • for all weathers
  • for families
  • for individual guests
  • Suitable for seniors
5,00 € per person
Total length over 300 meters on 4 height levels.

According to the intended purpose of the building, constant temperatures of around 10 degrees Celsius and a humidity of around 90 percent prevail at all times of the year. For the duration of your visit, please dress appropriately for these conditions and wear sturdy shoes. Some stairs lead down to the cellars, which are up to 8 meters below ground level. Access is not barrier-free.

Where:

Address:

Merseburg Art Association e.V.

Deep cellar 3
06217 Merseburg
Phone: +49 3461 / 2899232
E-mail: merkunst@web.de
website: http://www-tiefer-keller.de/

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